Clermont County Animal Resources

Ideas to Successfully Re-Home Your Furry Family Member

Responsibly Re-Home Your Pet in Clermont County, Ohio

Alternatives to Re-Homing

Re-homing a pet is a difficult decision. There are many factors to consider and it can be heartbreaking for the whole family. Before attempting to find a new home for your animal companion, there are a few resources that you can utilize to keep your pet home.

If you are looking for pet-friendly housing, visit our resource page> and follow the steps to find a place where you can take your family member with you.

If your animal is in need of spay/neuter or vaccinations that you cannot afford, visit our listing of low-cost and free resources.

If your animal is having behavioral issues, for cats click here and for dogs click here to visit the ASPCA website for tips on fixing those problems.

In addition to these steps, you can contact us at (513) 732-8854 or through our online form and we will attempt to assist you in keeping your pet in their home.

RE-HOMing A PET

If the above steps to avoid re-homing your animal have not worked, we have listed a few tips on how to responsibly and safely re-home your companion to give them the best potential outcome.

First, prepare the animal for adoption. To increase the chances of finding a home and the success of the new home, it is important that the pet is:

  • Spayed (for females) or neutered (for males).
  • In good health and up-to-date on vaccinations.
  • Clean and groomed.

If your pet isn’t spayed or neutered, have it done. Placing an animal who has not been spayed/neutered into a new home can result in unwanted litters and undesirable mating behaviors, such as mounting or howling. For more information, and low-cost resources, please check the spay/neuter resource section on our website.

Next, show your pet in the best light. If you want to catch a potential adopter’s attention, this is where your pet needs to shine! Photos and descriptions really help people make a connection to an animal. Take several good-quality digital photos of your pet. Make sure your pet is well-groomed, is looking at the camera, and can be seen clearly in the photos. Then, tell their story. Explain the circumstances leading to your need to surrender, and help the reader get to know your pet. Click here for some great tips from the organization HeARTs Speak for writing your pet’s bio.

And finally, advertise widely and wisely. Get the word out in as many places as possible to increase your chances of success in finding a new home for your animal. Ask your friends and family to help get the word out but screen applicants well, asking for a vet reference if they already have pets.

“Free to Good Home” is a dangerous way to re-home a pet. There are, unfortunately, many people out there that scour these ads, on sites like Craigslist and others, to find cats and dogs for malicious reasons such as dog fighting bait. Call references for your pet’s potential new family and be selective.

Here are some sites that will help you connect with prospective adopters and responsibly re-home your pet.

  • Adopt-A-Pet North America’s largest non-profit pet adoption website helps hundreds of thousands of pets be seen and adopted.
  • Get Your Pet An online community that connects people who want to adopt a pet with people who need to find their pet a new home.
  • How I Met My Dog Offers custom matching based on 30 levels of human and dog compatibility.

If you have tried all alternatives to re-homing your pet, are still in need of assistance, and live in Clermont County, contact us at (513) 732-8854 or through our online form.

Source: BestFriends.org

Spay/Neuter Resources

Six to eight million healthy, adoptable dogs and cats are relinquished to animal shelters in our country every year. Of these, only a small percentage are reclaimed, adopted or rescued, leaving three to four million to be euthanized.

We believe that a No-Kill community for cats and dogs in Clermont County is achievable, but it will take both adoption and spay/neuter of homeless animals to get us there. Spaying and neutering prevents unwanted births, substantially reducing the number of animals that will end up in shelters by preventing hundreds of thousands of unwanted kitten and puppy births annually.

To help stop the cycle of unwanted animals, the following spay/neuter resources are available for Clermont residents.

Cincinnati Area Spay Neuter Resources
Free transport to the UCAN Spay/Neuter Clinic is available the 4th Tuesday of every month. Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society is a designated pickup location for the clinic, providing round-trip transport to the Camp Washington clinic, located 28 miles away.

United Coalition for Animals (UCAN) operates a non-profit, low-cost spay/neuter clinic to serve pet owners with low-incomes and people caring for free-roaming cats. The price for a standard dog surgery is $75. Call 513-762-0130 to schedule an appointment.

Smith’s Pit Stop, founded by the previous Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society’s Board President, is a local non-profit that offers free spay/neuters for pitbulls in the Greater Cincinnati area. You can make a request online to take advantage of this service.

League for Animal Welfare (LFAW) is a private no-kill shelter in Batavia dedicated to advocating for spaying and neutering pets in our community. The League’s Spay/Neuter Voucher Program began three decades ago as a way to offer financial assistance to pet owners, making these surgeries more affordable. Vouchers cover $30 per cat and $50 per dog toward the cost of surgery, with pet owners contributing the balance. Vouchers are accepted at many local veterinary clinics. After scheduling an appointment for your pet(s), call the League at 513-735-2299 to request a voucher.  Vouchers are emailed directly to pet owners and must be presented to the clinic at the time of service.  Your vet will deduct the voucher amount from the total spay/neuter surgery cost.

Pet Friendly Housing in Clermont County

Cincinnati Pet Friendly Hosuing
As Clermont Animal CARE, we know that pets are family and that finding pet-friendly housing can be challenging. In fact, according to the ASPCA, housing is one of the main reasons people re-home their pets, whether it’s due to a lack of space or issues with the property manager. In an effort to help keep pets with families, we have compiled this list of local housing options that includes information we’ve gathered on pet breed and weight restrictions, and deposit requirements. Those with no breed restrictions are highlighted in yellow below.

This list is meant to be a guide in your search, but we recommend checking with the property manager to confirm details as information is subject to change at any time. Please help us keep this list current by contacting us with changes or additions.

Pet Friendly Housing Options

Clermont County Pet Friendly Housing Options

Steps to Finding Pet-Friendly Housing

  1. Give yourself enough time. Nobody likes the hassles involved with moving, much less finding rental housing that accepts pets. If you are renting now, start to check ads and contact real estate agents and rental agencies at least six weeks before your lease expires.
  2. Understand why many housing communities reject pets. Put yourself in the shoes of a landlord, housing manager, property owner, or condominium association board member for a moment: They may have had bad experiences with irresponsible pet owners who didn’t safely confine their animals or pick up their feces, sneaked pets in, or left ruined carpets and drapes when they moved out. They may be worried about complaints from neighbors about barking dogs and wonder how they are going to deal effectively with pet owners if problems arise. All these concerns are legitimate. That’s why people looking for an apartment, house, or condominium to rent must be able to sell themselves as responsible pet owners, who are committed to providing responsible pet care and being responsible neighbors.
  3. Make use of available resources. Contact the humane society or animal care and control agency serving the area into which you are moving; the agency may be able to provide you with a list of apartment communities that allow pets. If you know any real estate agents, rental agents, or resident managers who own pets themselves or who share your love of animals, ask them for leads. While there is no substitute for making a professional connection with someone who understands how important your pet is to you, look for a community apartment guidebook at the supermarket or near newspaper distribution boxes on the street. The guide may indicate which apartment communities allow pets and may list any restrictions, such as species allowed or weight limits. In addition, be sure to check local newspapers.
  4. Recognize that it may be futile to try to sell yourself and your pet to a large rental community with a no-pets policy. You’re more likely to be successful if you focus on places that allow most pets, allow certain pets (for example, cats or dogs weighing less than 20 pounds), or that don’t say, “Sorry, no pets.” Individual home and condominium owners may be easiest to persuade. Ideally, look for a community with appropriate pet-keeping guidelines that specify resident obligations. That’s the kind of place that’s ideal for pet owners because you’ll know that other pet caregivers there also are committed to being responsible residents.
  5. Gather proof that you’re responsible. The more documentation you can provide attesting to your conscientiousness as a pet owner, the more convincing your appeal will be to your future landlord. Compile the following documents:
    • A letter of reference from your current landlord or condominium association verifying that you are a responsible pet owner.
    • Written proof that your adult dog has completed a training class, or that your puppy is enrolled in one.
    • A letter from your veterinarian stating that you have been diligent in your pet’s medical care. Supply documentation that your pet has been spayed or neutered and vaccinated against rabies. (Sterilized pets are healthier, calmer, and far less likely to be a nuisance to neighbors.) Most veterinarians routinely fulfill such requests for their clients.
  6. Make your request to the individual or group with the ultimate authority to grant your request. Usually this will be the owner of the house or apartment. The owner may, however, delegate the decision to a property manager or resident manager. Check to see if, in addition to obtaining the landlord’s approval, you must also submit a written request to the building’s board of directors (or association, in the case of a condominium community).
  7. If you encounter a no-pets policy, ask if it is the result of a negative experience with a previous resident. Addressing your landlord’s prior experience may show you how to present your own request most effectively.
  8. Let the landlord, manager, or condominium board know that you share any concerns about cleanliness. Point out that your pet is house trained or litter-box trained. Emphasize that you always clean up after your dog outdoors and that you always properly dispose of your pet’s waste.
  9. Promote yourself. Responsible pet owners make excellent residents. Because they must search harder for a place to live, pet caregivers are more likely to stay put. Lower vacancy rates mean lower costs and fewer headaches for landlords and real estate agents. Let prospective landlords and managers know that you understand that living with a companion animal is a privilege, not a right.
  10. Promote your pet. Offer to bring your pet to meet the owner or property manager, or invite the landlord to visit you and your pet in your current home. A freshly groomed, well-behaved pet will speak volumes. Emphasize that the same pride you take in caring for your pet extends to taking care of your home. Many landlords are concerned about fleas, so be sure to let your prospective landlord know that you maintain an active flea-control program for your pet and home. Provide written proof that your pet is spayed or neutered and is, therefore, healthier, calmer, and less likely to be a nuisance. Make it clear to the landlord, manager, or condominium board that you keep your cat inside and your dog under control at all times and that you understand the health and safety benefits of doing so. If you can’t arrange for a meeting, consider making a short scrapbook with photos of your pampered pet in her or his current home, and/or draw up a “resume” for your pet. Scrapbooks and resumes are unique ideas that are guaranteed to make a strong, yet positive, impression.
  11. Be willing to pay a little extra. Tell your prospective landlord or resident manager that you are willing to pay an extra security deposit to cover any damages your pet might make to the property.
  12. Get it in writing. Once you have been given permission by a landlord, manager, or condominium committee to have a pet, be sure to get it in writing. Sign a pet addendum to your rental agreement. Comprehensive agreements protect people, property, and the pets themselves. If your lease has a no-pets clause, verbal approval won’t be enough. The no-pets clause should be removed from the lease (or crossed out and initialed) before you sign it. Be sure it has been removed from or crossed out on your landlord’s copy, too. You may be required to pay a pet deposit, some or all of which may be nonrefundable. Be sure to discuss deposits and monthly pet-related fees in advance. And have these fees put into writing, too. Request a copy of any house rules pertaining to pets. Let the landlord know that you will abide by the rules set for the broader community and respect the concerns of residents who do not own pets.
  13. Be honest. Don’t try to sneak your pet in. Keeping an animal in violation of a no-pets rule contributes to the general inclination of landlords not to allow pets. You also may be subject to possible eviction or other legal action.

If all of these actions fail and you have tried to find a home for your pet with trusted friends and family Re-homing Your Pet, call Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society at (513) 732-8854 or by email at wecare@clermontanimalcare.org.

Courtesy of HSUS

Cat Declawing Explained

What is Declawing?

According to the American Association of Feline Practioners (AAFP), declawing is defined as: “(A)n elective and ethically controversial procedure, which is NOT medically necessary for cats in most instances. Declawing entails the amputation of a cat’s third phalanx [P3], or third ‘toe bone.’ Unlike human nails, cats’ claws are attached to the last bone in their toes. A comparison in human terms would be cutting off a person’s finger at the last joint of each finger.”

Explanation of Cat Declawing

Potential Long-Term Effects of Declawing

As a major surgery, declawing comes with many potential surgical and long-term complications.

In addition to the pain and confusion caused by the sudden loss of an important part of the cat’s body, cats who have been declawed often appear in animal shelters due to behavioral problems ranging from biting to inappropriate elimination, or urinating or defecating outside of the litter box.

According to the AAFP, these risks increase with age and could include lameness, chronic neuropathic pain, and arthritis. (1)

Alternatives to Declawing

Thankfully, there are many alternatives to declawing your cat. See below for a step-by-step guide to stopping unwanted scratching behavior in cats.

Step 1: Purchase several different types of scratching posts, like this one or this one. Place these scratching posts in areas where you want to deter scratching like the living room near the couch. It may help to spray some catnip spray on these scratchers to encourage engagement.

Step 2: Get your cat used to having their paws touched. Do this from an early age. This will allow you to follow step 3, which is…

Step 3: Clip your cat’s nails every 2-3 weeks. A good rule of thumb is to cut your cat’s nails whenever you clip your own. Get a suitable cat-specific nail clipper like this one for the job. If you have a disability and cannot clip the cat’s nails yourself, try to enlist friends or family members to assist you in the process. If this is not available, Petco and Petsmart locations, as well as your personal vet, offer low-cost nail clipping services.

Step 4: If Fluffy is still going to town on your couch, try covering the main scratching areas with blankets – if she cannot see the scratching target, she is less likely to attempt to mark it.

Step 5: Invest in cat nail caps such as these. These are plastic caps that are placed over the cat’s nails so that she cannot scratch. They have to be replaced every few weeks as the cat’s nails grow, but they do work as a last resort.

Do not hesitate to contact Clermont Animal CARE Humane Society at (513)732-8854 or wecare@ClermontAnimalCARE.org if you are in need of guidance on keeping your cat in your home.

References and Resources

  1. https://www.catvets.com/guidelines/position-statements/declawing
  2. https://www.purrfectpost.com/train-your-cat-to-stop-scratching-your-couch-in-7-days-or-less/
  3. https://www.jacksongalaxy.com/blog/how-to-stop-your-cats-from-scratching-furniture/

Pet Disaster Prep

Preparing Your Pet for a Natural Disaster
Emergencies come in many forms, and they may require anything from a brief absence from your home to permanent evacuation. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep your pets safe, so the best thing you can do for yourself and your pets is to be prepared.

Here are simple steps you can follow now to make sure you’re ready before the next disaster strikes:

Step 1: Get a Rescue Alert Sticker

This easy-to-use sticker will let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers (we recommend placing it on or near your front door), and that it includes the types and number of pets in your home as well as the name and number of your veterinarian. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write “EVACUATED” across the stickers. To get a free emergency pet alert sticker for your home, Go here and allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. Your local pet supply store may also sell similar stickers.

Step 2: Arrange a Safe Haven

Arrange a safe haven for your pets in the event of evacuation. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. Remember, if it isn’t safe for you, it isn’t safe for your pets. They may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all human shelters accept pets, so it is important that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time:

  • Contact your veterinarian for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities
  • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets
  • Identify hotels or motels outside of your immediate area that accept pets
  • Ask friends and relatives outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your pet

Step 3: Choose “Designated Caregivers”

This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence. She or he should be someone who is generally home during the day while you are at work or has easy access to your home. A set of keys should be given to this trusted individual. This may work well with neighbors who have pets of their own—you may even swap responsibilities, depending upon who has accessibility.

When selecting a permanent caregiver, you’ll need to consider other criteria. This is a person to whom you are entrusting the care of your pet in the event that something should happen to you. When selecting this “foster parent,” consider people who have met your pet and have successfully cared for animals in the past. Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so she or he understands the responsibility of caring for your pet.

Step 4: Prepare Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits

If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. Even if you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. When recommendations for evacuation have been announced, follow the instructions of local and state officials. To minimize evacuation time, take these simple steps:

  • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification information. Your pet’s ID tag should contain her name, telephone number and any urgent medical needs. Be sure to also write your pet’s name, your name, and contact information on your pet’s carrier.
  • The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted under the skin in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by a scanner at most animal shelters.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented and wander away from home in a crisis.
  • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where it is, and that it clearly labeled and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your “Evac-Pack” include:
    • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include)
    • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate regularly)
    • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
    • Litter
    • Paper towels
    • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
    • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
    • Pet feeding dishes and water bowls
    • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
    • Photocopies and/or USB of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit—otherwise they may go bad or become useless)
    • At least seven days’ worth of bottled water for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace regularly)
    • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
    • Flashlight
    • Blanket
    • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make “Lost” posters)
    • Especially for cats: Pillowcase, toys, scoop-able litter
    • Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week’s worth of cage liner

You should also have an emergency kit for the human members of the family. Items to include: Batteries, duct tape, flashlight, radio, multi-tool, tarp, rope, permanent marker, spray paint, baby wipes, protective clothing and footwear, extra cash, rescue whistle, important phone numbers, extra medication and copies of medical and insurance information.

Special Considerations for Horses

  • Keep a clean and tidy stable and pasture. Remove hazardous and flammable materials, debris and machinery from around the barn’s walkways, entrances and exits. Regularly maintain and inspect barn floors and septic tanks. Inspect your grounds regularly and remove dangerous debris in the pasture.
  • Prevent fires by instituting a no-smoking policy around your barn. Avoid using or leaving on appliances in the barn, even seemingly-harmless appliances like box fans, heaters and power tools can overheat. Exposed wiring can also lead to electrical fires in the barn, as can a simple nudge from an animal who accidentally knocks over a machine.
  • Get your horse used to wearing a halter, and get him used to trailering. Periodically, you should practice quickly getting your horse on a trailer for the same reason that schools have fire drills—asking a group of unpracticed children to exit a burning building in a calm fashion is a little unrealistic, as is requesting a new and strange behavior of your horse.
  • If you own a trailer, please inspect it regularly. Also, make sure your towing vehicle is appropriate for the size and weight of the trailer and horse. Always make sure the trailer is hitched properly—the hitch locked on the ball, safety chains or cables attached, and emergency brake battery charged and linked to towing vehicle. Proper tire pressure (as shown on the tire wall) is also very important.
  • Get your horse well-socialized and used to being handled by all kinds of strangers. If possible, invite emergency responders and/or members of your local fire service to interact with your horse. It will be mutually beneficial for them to become acquainted. Firemen’s turnout gear may smell like smoke and look unusual, which many horses find frightening—so ask them to wear their usual response gear to get your horse used to the look and smell.
  • Set up a phone tree/buddy system with other nearby horse owners and local farms. This could prove invaluable should you—or they—need to evacuate animals or share resources like trailers, pastures or extra hands!
  • Keep equine veterinary records in a safe place where they can quickly be reached. Be sure to post emergency phone numbers by the phone. Include your 24-hour veterinarian, emergency services and friends. You should also keep a copy for emergency services personnel in the barn that includes phone numbers for you, your emergency contact, your 24-hour veterinarian and several friends.

Special Considerations for Birds

  • Birds should be transported in a secure travel cage or carrier.
  • In cold weather, make certain you have a blanket over your pet’s cage. This may also help reduce the stress of traveling.
  • In warm weather, carry a spray bottle to periodically moisten your bird’s feathers.
  • Have recent photos available, and keep your bird’s leg bands on for identification.
  • If the carrier does not have a perch, line it for paper towels that you can change frequently.
  • Keep the carrier in as quiet an area as possible.
  • It is particularly imperative that birds eat on a daily basis, so purchase a timed feeder. If you need to leave your bird unexpectedly, the feeder will ensure his daily feeding schedule.
  • Items to keep on hand: Catch net, heavy towel, blanket or sheet to cover cage, cage liner.

Special Considerations for Reptiles

  • A snake may be transported in a pillowcase, but you should have permanent and secure housing for him when you reach a safe place.
  • Take a sturdy bowl that is large for your pet to soak in. It’s also a good idea to bring along a heating pad or other warming devise, such as a hot water bottle.
  • Lizards can be transported like birds (see above).

Special Considerations for Small Animals

  • Small animals, such as hamsters, gerbils, mice and guinea pigs, should be transported in secure carriers with bedding materials, food and food bowls.
  • Items to keep on hand: Salt lick, extra water bottle, small hidebox or tube, a week’s worth of bedding.

Reference: ASPCA

Guidelines to Exercise Your Pet

Do you feel guilty that your pet doesn’t get enough time with you? It’s a trap that happens to most of us, but one that can be easily remedied. Here are some guidelines for enriching your pet’s life and health through exercise.

Why Exercising Your Dog Makes Sense

Big or small, young or old, dogs need to exercise daily. While some breeds have special needs that have to be taken into account, and dogs do slow down as they age, they still need to take part in some form of daily physical activity. Without activity, your dog will become bored, frustrated and unhealthy. Exercise tones the muscles, helps the body and metabolic system to function properly, and engages the mind. Anyone who has had a dog that suffers from lack of physical activity and mental stimulation will tell you that they will often turn to destructive behaviors — behaviors that magically disappear once the dog is getting out everyday.

Dog and Cat Exercise Guidelines

Physically, dogs will also become obese if they are not allowed to burn off the calories they take in during the day. This is especially true if they are being given a lot of treats in compensation for lack of attention.

How Much is Too Much Exercise?

Though exercise needs are based on a dog’s age, breed, size and overall health, your dog should spend between 30 minutes to two hours on an activity every day. Breeds in the hunting, working, or herding groups (e.g., Labrador retrievers, hounds, collies and shepherds) will need the most exercise. If your dog is in one of these groups and is in good health, she should be getting at least 30 minutes of rigorous exercise along with her 1-2 hours of daily activity.

Requirements aren’t as easily established for every other dog. Because most dogs are of mixed heritage, their needs will be different depending on the breed they are descended from. If your dog is a short nosed breed, like a Bulldog, for example, he will not need a lot of daily exercise. A casual walk around the neighborhood will be sufficient. Pay attention to your dog’s signals. If he is restless or pacing, he is probably itching to get out for a nice long walk. If, on the other hand, your dog is content to just lie around, there may not be such a great need for exercise. A short walk will be enough to keep everything in order.

Dogs that are less active or older may have conditions that are slowing them down. Whether it is because of too much weight, achy joints and muscles, or they just like to mellow out most of the time, they still need some activity to keep the body working as it should.

Even dogs that are handicapped, like those that use specially equipped wheelchairs or carts, often enjoy a walk through the neighborhood. Some can even continue to take part in water activities!

If you have any concerns about whether your dog can handle a long walk or whether you should implement an exercise plan for her, talk to your veterinarian. You don’t want to pressure your dog into doing things that are too strenuous or you could end up with bigger problems. Start slow if your dog has not been accustomed to being physically active, and observe her response, adding more activities or more mileage as she gets stronger. Your dog should be happily tired, not exhausted, when you are done exercising her for the day.

Tips Before Beginning an Exercise Program

Before you begin an exercise program with your dog, be sure to visit your veterinarian for a health check. Your doctor can recommend an exercises plan that is appropriate for your dog’s age, breed and condition. Plan to start out slowly and work your way up to longer walking or playing routines as they seem suitable. Additionally, don’t forget to allow for a warm-up period and cool-down time at the end of your session. A leisurely walk to the park or around the block before exercise should be enough to warm the muscles and prepare them for a serious game of catch.

And don’t forget that mental stimulation is just as important as physical exercise. Don’t be afraid of taking new running paths with your dog, going to different dog parks in your area, or introducing new toys and games to your routine. Most importantly, spend time exercising daily, not just on the weekends, even if only for a short time. At the very least, dogs and humans alike can benefit from 30 minutes of physical activity each day. Start simple, without putting pressure on yourself or your dog, and you will find that you are both looking forward to this happy time of the day — every day.

Reference: PetMD

Pet Fire Safety

Pet Fire Safety

Each year, more than 500,000 pets are affected by house fires. In order to prevent and prepare for a possible house fire, it is important to remember your pets when thinking about your fire preparedness plan.

Preventing a Fire

  • Reduce open flame exposure – Pets are curious and may try to investigate your unattended candles or fireplace. Opt instead for flameless candles or an enclosed fireplace to prevent an accidental knock or escaped ember from burning out of control.
  • Put covers on or remove stove knobs and discourage climbing in the kitchen – an accidental nudge of a stove knob is the number one cause of house fires started by pets. By preventing your pet from interacting with a stove, you can take a big step toward preventing fires.
  • Secure loose wires – Pets may like to chew on wires and cords, but ensure that these items are out of reach from your pet, as they can lead to fires.
  • Never put a glass bowl on a wooden porch – The sun’s rays can heat the bowl and cause a fire on your wooden deck. Opt instead for ceramic or stainless-steel dishes when outside.

Preparing for a Fire

  • Include your pet into your family emergency plan and practice taking them with you. Talk with your family members to determine who is responsible for grabbing your pets and who should grab their supplies (food, medication, photo, leashes and carriers, medical records) during an emergency so you can reduce scrambling and redundancy when speed and efficiency are needed.
  • Put a decal in your home’s front window indicating the number and type of pets you have – Providing this information can cut down on the time responders spend searching your home in the case of a fire.
  • Make sure your pet’s updated contact information is reflected on their ID collar and in the microchip database – If your pet gets lost during a fire, this will help rescuers get her or him back to you.
  • Use monitored smoke detectors that are connected to emergency responders – Should a fire start while you are away from your home, you’ll rest assured that your pet has access to emergency response services even if no one is home to call them.
  • Know your pets’ hideaways and create ways for easy access to them in case of an emergency – It’s nice that your pet can get away if she or he wants to, but in an emergency, you need to be able to locate and extract your pet as quickly as possible.

During a Fire

  • Attempt to grab your pet and exit the home as quickly as possible, but if it takes too long to locate or secure them, leave – You should never delay escape or endanger yourself or your family. Once responders get there, immediately inform them your pet is still inside, so they can go enter your home and continue looking for your pet.
  • Grab leashes and carriers on your way out – Outside will be chaotic and that may cause your pet to try to escape to a calm, safe area.
  • Never go back inside a burning house. If you can’t find your pet, leave, open the door, and call to them repeatedly from a safe distance away. Let firefighters take over the task of locating your pet.

Reference: American Humane

Tips to Prevent Accidental Pet Poisoning

If you’ve never inspected your home or aren’t aware of the things that could be poisonous to your pet, now is the time to educate yourself! There are so many poisonous substances that can be harmful and even fatal to our pets, so it is important to know what’s in your home and also to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms that your pet may be in danger.

Inspect!

Regular inspections are the best way to ensure that your home is free of elements that may be toxic to your pet. Let’s go room to room and talk about some things that could be harmful to your pet.

Tips to Prevent Accidental Pet Poisoning

Kitchen

The kitchen is one of the most important rooms when it comes to poison prevention. People often make the mistake of assuming that certain table foods are safe for their pet, but this is a dangerous way of thinking. The following foods have been shown to be potentially harmful to pets:

  • Chocolate – especially dark chocolate, coffee, caffeine
  • Raisons and grapes
  • Yeast dough
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Raw or undercooked meat
  • Table salt
  • Garlic, onion and chives
  • Avocado

These are just some of the most common foods that can be hazardous to your pet. However, consult with your veterinarian before sharing any table food with your pet.

Bathroom

The bathroom can be a dangerous place for your pet. Make sure you keep the following items in a place that is not accessible to your pet:

  • Human and pet medications
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Shampoo/conditioner
  • Bath salts and bathing liquids
  • Feminine hygiene products

Living Room

Household plants are a popular topic when it comes to poison prevention for our pets. If you are a pet owner and you like to keep plants in and around your home, be sure that you do your research before bringing a plant into your home that could be harmful to your pet.

Miscellaneous Household Items that Can be Toxic to Your Pet

  • Batteries
  • Potpourri
  • Insecticides
  • Rodenticides
  • Plant fertilizer/plant food
  • Antifreeze
  • Yarn, rubber bands, dental floss

Secure!

Make sure that potentially toxic items are out of your pet’s reach. Pets can be pretty creative about finding a way to get into things, am I right?

  • Keep human medications and pet medications in separate areas, both secure and out of reach.
  • If you have multiple pets, make sure that their medications are kept separate, in order to keep them from getting mixed up.

Learn!

Do the necessary research to educate yourself on the topics surrounding poison prevention. What items are toxic to your pet? Talk to your veterinarian to find out if there are certain foods that may be more toxic to your pet than others. Read up on household plants and make sure that you don’t keep any toxic plants inside your home. Knowledge is power!

Read!

Pay attention to the labels on the items in your home. The label will often warn you if the substance is toxic to you or your pet.
Before administering any medication to your pet, make sure you read and understand the directions, and follow any doctor’s orders exactly.

Know!

Do you know what the common signs and symptoms of poisoning are? This is an important part of poison prevention. If you notice that your pet is displaying any of the following signs or symptoms, call your veterinarian immediately!

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lethargy
  • Convulsions

If you can’t get in contact with your veterinarian, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Prepare!

It is important to be prepared in the event that any emergency arises with your pet, and that includes possible poisoning. Keep emergency resources on hand and have the number of your local veterinary emergency hospital in an accessible place, so that you can seek help immediately.

Resource: Wellness Pet Food

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